Blog Archive

Deaf Grab Drivers – We can do anything but hear

Mr Steven Chong and Mr Aloysius Lee shares their experience driving with Grab.

A report from World Federation of the Deaf (2009) found that out of 93 national deaf organizations around the world, 31 of them still deny Deaf people of their right to drive in their country. allow deaf people to obtain a driver’s license in their country. 

Read what Grab has been doing to enable Deaf drivers here.
Click here for the Mandarin translation.

The Merdeka Stories II

One of the stories in ‘The Merdeka Stories II’ film series is inspired by Ms Barbara D’Cotta – who is the head of SADeaf’s deaf education department and has dedicated many years of service to teaching deaf students.

Read the article here: https://www.straitstimes.com/…/lifeguard-and-special-educat…

Photo credits: The Straits Times

Duo Sense: Hard & Piano

Dr Azariah Tan is featured in Lianhe Zaobao & The Straits Times for his upcoming performance “Duo Sense: Harp and Piano”.

He describes the two pieces he will be performing as an experience navigating through the vicissitudes of a magnificent life and finally returning to an original peace.

Catch his enthralling performance on the 30 November, 7.30pm – 9.30pm at the Esplanade Recital Studio. For tickets: https://www.esplanade.com/events/…/duo-senses-harp-and-piano

Click here for the full article: https://www.zaobao.com.sg/zlifestyle/…/story20191126-1008307

Sweeney Todd (Sign Language Interpretation)

The first sign language interpreted performance in Sands Theatre!

Sweeney Todd will have the first sign language interpreted performance at the Sands Theatre! There will be two access performances (Sign Language and Audio Described) on 8 Dec, 6pm. Tickets via: http://bit.ly/sweeney-todd-access

Posted by Singapore Repertory Theatre on Wednesday, 27 November 2019

Staged by Singapore Repertory Theatre, Sweeney Todd will be the first sign language interpreted performance at the Sands Theatre!

There will be two access performances (Sign Language and Audio Described) on 8 Dec, 6pm. Tickets via: http://bit.ly/sweeney-todd-access

Yuogan’s Story

My name is Vasuthan Yuogan and I’m born deaf. I’m 21 years old this year. My mother passed away in a tragic car accident when I was three. Unable to accept the loss of my mother, my father drank and smoked excessively, and later developed lung disease. He was also diagnosed with depression when I was eight and was admitted to the Institute of Mental Health. He had no means and ability to care for me. Hence, I have been staying in the Boys’ Home for as long as I can remember.

I’m currently studying Facility and Technology at NITEC. My dream is to be the first Deaf person to succeed in the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry.

My humble achievements would not have been possible without the support of The Singapore Association for the Deaf (SADeaf), as well as my teachers from the Deaf school. They gave me a sense of direction and helped me achieve every little milestone and goal in my life.

“SADeaf has encouraged me to stay strong and emphasised that I need to study hard not only for myself but also for my late mother. One day I will have a place to call home and start a family of my own.”

It’s important for Deaf children to receive essential support to reach their full potential. Please donate generously to SADeaf. Only with sufficient resources to cover the Association’s daily operational expenses, SADeaf can continue their work to run meaningful programmes to benefit and better serve the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing community. This may help transform the lives of Deaf people like me so that I may better integrate with society

Beat the Tax!

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All donations are entitled to 250% tax deduction. (Donation amount of $2000 x 250% = $5000 tax deduction)

Click here for other modes of donation

Former Patron Mrs S R Nathan receives Honorary Posthumous IRO Award on behalf of her husband

The Singapore Association for the Deaf (SADeaf) congratulates our former Patron Mrs S R Nathan on receiving the Honorary Posthumous IRO Award on behalf of her husband – the late President of Singapore Mr S R Nathan. Mrs Nathan, who was SADeaf’s Patron from 2000 – 2013, accepted the award from Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at a gala dinner to commemorate the IRO’s 70th anniversary. The award honours Mr Nathan’s commitment in promoting the cause of inter-religious cohesion and harmony.

Photo: Courtesy of Straits Times

First Deaf Recipient of the Public Service Medal (Posthumous)

The Singapore Association for the Deaf is proud to announce Mr Peng Tsu Ying (92), the late former trustee of the Association will be receiving the highly-honoured Public Service Medal (Posthumous) at the National Day Awards in 2019 for his selfless dedication to Deaf education for decades. 

About Mr Mr Peng Tsu Ying

Mr Peng, who passed away in October last year, lost his hearing at the age of five after taking too much medicine for a high fever. After receiving education for the Deaf in Hong Kong and Shanghai, he came to Singapore in 1948 to help his father in his business. When he arrived, he realised that Singapore did not have a Deaf school and he decided to establish one, so that the Deaf can have access to education.

However, the colonial government then only approved him to run a school at his home. He then started his private school in 1951, initially with only nine students. With the help of his reporter friends, Mr Peng published articles in two Chinese newspapers to advertise his school and raised $5000. In 1954, he established the Singapore Chinese Sign School for the Deaf at Charlton Road in 1954, using Shanghainese Sign Language as the medium of instruction.

The school merged with the Oral School for the Deaf, established by the Singapore Red Cross, in 1963 to form the Singapore School for the Deaf. Mr Peng was one of its founding Principals and led the school’s Chinese Sign Language department.

Besides dedicating his life to Deaf education, Mr Peng was also an outstanding motor racer. From 1959 to 1967, he won 36 trophies in the local motorsport races with his Lotus open-top sports car. In a media interview after a race in 1975, he said that he took part in motorsports to prove that “being deaf is no handicap in being skillful.” 

Mr Peng is survived by three children, seven grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

First Deaf Recipient of the Public Service Medal (Posthumous)

The Singapore Association for the Deaf is proud to announce Mr Peng Tsu Ying (92), the late former trustee of the Association will be receiving the highly-honoured Public Service Medal (Posthumous) at the National Day Awards in 2019 for his selfless dedication to Deaf education for decades. About Mr Mr Peng Tsu YingMr Peng, who passed away in October last year, lost his hearing at the age of five after taking too much medicine for a high fever. After receiving education for the Deaf in Hong Kong and Shanghai, he came to Singapore in 1948 to help his father in his business. When he arrived, he realised that Singapore did not have a Deaf school and he decided to establish one, so that the Deaf can have access to education. However, the colonial government then only approved him to run a school at his home. He then started his private school in 1951, initially with only nine students. With the help of his reporter friends, Mr Peng published articles in two Chinese newspapers to advertise his school and raised $5000. In 1954, he established the Singapore Chinese Sign School for the Deaf at Charlton Road in 1954, using Shanghainese Sign Language as the medium of instruction. The school merged with the Oral School for the Deaf, established by the Singapore Red Cross, in 1963 to form the Singapore School for the Deaf. Mr Peng was one of its founding Principals and led the school’s Chinese Sign Language department. Besides dedicating his life to Deaf education, Mr Peng was also an outstanding motor racer. From 1959 to 1967, he won 36 trophies in the local motorsport races with his Lotus open-top sports car. In a media interview after a race in 1975, he said that he took part in motorsports to prove that “being deaf is no handicap in being skillful.” Mr Peng is survived by three children, seven grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

Posted by The Singapore Association for the Deaf on Tuesday, 27 August 2019

ADVISORY ON FRAUDULENT DONATION APPEAL FOR THE DEAF COMMUNITY

Members of the public are advised to ignore or report to the police should you be approached for donation to the Deaf community by unauthorised agents. An image of a fraudulent donation card is provided below this advisory for your reference. Please do not respond to such donation requests. We also encourage donors and the public to practise “Ask. Check. Give.” before donating.

ADVISORY ON FRAUDULENT DONATION APPEAL FOR THE DEAF COMMUNITY

Members of the public are advised to ignore or report to the police should you be approached for donation to the Deaf community by unauthorised agents. An image of a fraudulent donation card is provided in the video for your reference. Please do not respond to such donation requests. We also encourage donors and the public to practise "Ask. Check. Give." before donating.Ask before giving.• Who is the beneficiary? • What will my donations be used for? • How can I receive updates?Check the fund-raiser’s legitimacy and terms and conditions.• Scan the QR code on the fund-raising permit; • SMS to 79777; or • Visit the Charity Portal and search for the charity name.Give with peace of mind.Together, we can build a trusted and thriving charity sector. For more information on Safer Giving, check out the Charity Portal (https://www.charities.gov.sg/Fund-Raising/Pages/Safer%20Giving.aspx).

Posted by The Singapore Association for the Deaf on Tuesday, 27 August 2019

Ask before giving.

  • Who is the beneficiary? 
  • What will my donations be used for? 
  • How can I receive updates?

Check the fund-raiser’s legitimacy and terms and conditions.

  • Scan the QR code on the fund-raising permit; 
  • SMS to 79777; or 
  • Visit the Charity Portal and search for the charity name.

Give with peace of mind.

Together, we can build a trusted and thriving charity sector. For more information on Safer Giving, check out the Charity Portal here.

‘Why take on the extra burden?’: Parents with disabilities tackle misconceptions about raising their own families

When Mdm Neo discovered that both of her children were deaf, like her and her husband, she took it in stride. “It didn’t matter that they were deaf,” signed the 69-year-old via interpreters from the Singapore Association of the Deaf.

“I was just worried about their education … I wasn’t sure how to teach them and had to send them to a school (for the deaf) to make sure they received proper education.”

Mdm Neo, who grew up with five other siblings who were also deaf, said her disability never deterred her from her role as a mother.

“I just wanted to look after my kids,” she said simply.

Find out more at
https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/parents-with-disabilities-tackle-misconceptions-raising-families-11729976?cid=fbcna

22-year-old Vanessa Chea says her hearing loss doesn’t make her different

SINGAPORE: When Ms Vanessa Chea sat for an exam in Temasek Polytechnic where she studied till a year ago, a lecturer asked if she needed extra time to complete the paper.

It was tempting for her to grab the advantage, but Ms Chea who is hard of hearingdeclined. 

“I just see myself like anybody else,” she told CNA. 

Her hearing difficulties do not affect her ability to think, something she feels not everyone knows.

“I noticed that people tend to associate hearing loss with intellectual disability,” she said. 

People also tend to think they needed to shout if someone cannot hear well, but this just hampers her ability to lip-read, she said. 

While she has mastered lip-reading, she said: “When you shout, the lip shape is very different from what you are saying, and that makes reading very difficult.”

Even if they do not have such misconceptions, they may not empathise with her condition. 

Ms Chea recalled having a lecturer who refused to use a device that would help her hear better in class. 

“She found that it is not a good thing for me to depend too much on technology,” she said.

Ms Chea ended up not being able to follow her lessons.

She has also had peers take advantage of her hearing loss to claim credit for her work, Ms Chea said. 

CUTTING THROUGH THE NOISE

Her struggles fade into the background when she is looking through the lens of a camera.

Born the middle child to avid photographer parents, Ms Chea initially did not like the hobby. 

“I thought it was all about just pressing the shutter button and the picture coming out,” she said 

But her view changed after attending a workshop with a professional landscape and nature photographer who displayed photos taken in scenic New Zealand.

Then 14 years old and a member of the Digital Media Club at Saint Anthony’s Canossian Secondary, she started appreciating the hobby. 

“When I started taking photos, I realised that the process of taking photos is quite challenging and tiring, because not only do you need to have a keen eye for it, you also need to learn to be fully prepared for whatever weather conditions,” she said. 

FROM NOT LIKING PHOTOGRAPHY TO WINNING AWARDS

She focused on mastering the techniques and started reaping the rewards soon enough. Ms Chea won the first time she entered a photography competition. She realised that the outcome could be different if she had not rushed from her class and arrived in time to an interview for shortlisted participants.

“So can you imagine how close I was to not getting the prize?” she asked. 

The photos she submitted made it to a display at the National Museum, she said with pride. 

The win was no fluke. She won in another photo competition, this time with pictures taken at the Supertree Grove at Gardens By The Bay, her favourite spot. 

“I prefer to take photos where there are not much people around, because it allows me to appreciate the nature, have some quiet time on my own,” she said animatedly.

Ms Chea has taken some risks to get the perfect shot. Once, she slipped on a rock, and another time, she stood undeterred as thunder rumbled and lightning flashed while others were scrambling for shelter. 

“Afterwards it poured. It was challenging. But when I see the photo, I am proud of it,” she said. 

Her family used to worry because she would often visit remote places to take photos. 

“They worry that with my hearing loss, I would not be aware of the dangers around me,” But Ms Chea’s other senses are heightened, and she is more careful to make up for what she cannot hear, she said. 

She also suffers a little for her art, getting back pain from walking around with her DSLR hanging from her neck, and blisters on her feet.

It was a relief then when she managed to get funding for a new, lighter camera through the Mediacorp Enable Fund. A social worker at Temasek Polytechnic had suggested that she apply for it. 

“My family is financially stable, but I find it painful to see my parents spend so much money for my education, my hearing needs, and I just don’t want to trouble them further. I don’t want to be a financial burden, so I decided to  apply,” she said. 

She added that in photography, having the right equipment is very important. 

“Having the right gear and equipment will allow me to achieve my vision better,” she said. 

DON’T BE AFRAID TO TRY NEW THINGS

Things are looking up for Ms Chea in other areas as well. 

Having undergone a cochlear implant earlier this year, she hears much better now.

She will also be starting university education this month, after having to postpone it due to her hearing problems.

Having once been someone who was not confident enough to try new things,  Ms Chea had advice for anyone who might feel uninspired: “Time waits for no man, so don’t be too afraid of trying new things. Trying something out of your comfort zone is a good thing.”

Ms Chea is a beneficiary of the Mediacorp Enable Fund (MEF), a charity fund by Mediacorp and SG Enable that aims to build a society where persons with disabilities are recognised for their abilities and lead full and socially integrated lives. Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong is its patron.


Source: CNA/ja
Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/i-just-see-myself-like-anybody-else-22-year-old-vanessa-chea-11789938